Posts Tagged ‘Landmarks Preservation Commission’

22nd September
2008

First Published in The New York Sun, September 22, 2008

By Andrew Wolf

The last game of Major League baseball has been played at Yankee Stadium, following an incredible outpouring of nostalgia and reminiscences. Now the vultures are swooping down to sell off the great coliseum, piece by piece. Seats will fetch about a $1,000 each, someone is ready to package the dirt from the field, holy ground to millions of baseball fans throughout the world, and even the urinals will be sold for their “historic” value.

It wasn’t supposed to be this way.

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18th July
2008

First Published in The New York Sun, July 18, 2008

By Andrew Wolf

It came as an relief to me that our Landmarks Preservation Commission has designated 30 mostly forgettable buildings along the west side of Manhattan as the “West Chelsea Historic District.” I can now sleep soundly secure in the knowledge that the R.C. Williams and Co. building, the Berlin and Jones Envelope Co. building, the Wolff Building and the Wolff Building Annex, and 26 others will be protected from the wrecking ball.

Meanwhile, several miles to the north, wrecking crews are anticipating the demolition of one of New York’s truly great, historic, and beloved landmarks, Yankee Stadium. Already it is being called the “old” Yankee Stadium much as we recall the “old” Penn Station, a great building destroyed in the name of progress and regretted ever since.

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7th July
2006

First Published in The New York Sun, July 7, 2006

By Andrew Wolf

For quite a while I have been warning against pushing for the designation of the ritzy Fieldston community in the northwest Bronx as a “historic” district. Few listened, and the plan was passed despite a clear majority of homeowners ultimately opposing this designation for their properties. Now the true cost of this folly is beginning to be realized.

Designating an area as a “historic district” puts all of the structures and vacant land therein under the jurisdiction of the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission. This is no small matter. If your house is included, even the smallest improvement to your property must be approved by city bureaucrats, and even, in some cases, public hearings before the Commission are required to be held. Even a matter as simple as installing an air conditioner in a window must be reviewed. (more…)