Posts Tagged ‘Fernando Ferrer’

12th June
2008

First Published in The New York Sun, June 12, 2008

By Andrew Wolf

On a visit to Washington, D.C. many years ago, a slick advertising supplement fell out of my morning newspaper. It was for a store I had never heard of, but immediately wished there was a branch in the New York area. The booklet was filled with the kind of furniture that would appeal to people who appreciated modern design and incredibly low prices, in other words many New Yorkers like me.

So I celebrate the opening of the city’s first Ikea branch in Red Hook, Brooklyn. I had hoped that the store would come first to my home borough of the Bronx.

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28th March
2008

First Published in The New York Sun, March 28, 2008

By Andrew Wolf

Good government types are quick to limit and monitor contributions to political campaigns. After all, we don’t want Assemblyman Jones to be unduly influenced by the $250 contribution sent by Citizen Smith who works for a bank that just happens to have legislation pending before some committee on which the good Assemblyman serves.

The problem is that the real corruption occurs not when the money comes in, but rather when it goes out. Scrutiny of this may be the sea change that will come out of the remarkable events in Albany these past three weeks.

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9th January
2007

First Published in The New York Sun, January 9, 2007

By Andrew Wolf

Herman Badillo and his new book, “One Nation, One Standard,” will be celebrated today at a luncheon held by the Manhattan Institute, where he will be introduced by Mayor Koch. Even before it hit the stores, the ideas expressed in the book have been a source of controversy because Mr. Badillo takes his fellow Hispanics to task for not stressing the importance of education to their children. “Education is not a high priority in the Hispanic community. … Hispanics have simply failed to recognize the overriding importance of education.”

Mr. Badillo’s standing comes not only from his own ethnic background and service as Bronx president and a member of Congress but also from his service as the chairman of the board of trustees of the City University of New York. After decades of declining reputation brought on by an “open admissions” policy, Mr. Badillo led the charge to end the practice of offering remedial classes for ill-prepared students in the system’s senior colleges. With remediation limited to the system’s two-year community colleges, high standards at the City University have returned and ignited a renaissance. (more…)

30th November
2006

First Published in The New York Sun, November 30, 2006

By Andrew Wolf

By immediately involving the district attorney in Queens County, on one level, Mayor Bloomberg effectively handled the shooting incident there this past weekend. The reaction from the community, while angry, has been restrained. We haven’t, at least yet, seen the kind of sustained demonstrations we saw after the death of Amadou Diallo in 1999, nor the angry confrontations of the late 1980s that helped drive Mayor Koch from office.

On another level, however, the mayor and the city may pay a price. Mr. Bloomberg seems to have tilted too far in his criticism of the police, and has accepted the presumption that this is a crime by promoting the involvement of the Queens D.A. New York City police officers, who must make split-second decisions of life and death, may have a right to feel skittish. They are responsible for reducing crime to levels so low that Gotham is now considered one of the nation’s safest cities, only to see the mayor undermine their presumption of innocence when the chips are down. But despite this, the race baiters are regrouping and are seeking not just a special prosecutor, but also a federal investigation. (more…)

27th June
2006

First Published in The New York Sun, June 27, 2006

By Andrew Wolf

Bronx Community Board 4 has in recent days become among the best known of the city’s 62 community boards. This is the board that voted against the plan to build the new Yankee Stadium. These boards only have advisory power. But having the weight of these “official” representatives of the local neighborhoods behind a project can influence the higher officials who really make the decisions.

Tonight, at Bronx Lebanon Hospital on the Grand Concourse, the board will hold its final meeting before old terms expire and new ones begin. Fireworks are expected. The board that will be in place next week will look quite different from the one that will meet tonight. Members of the board who ignored the wishes of the Bronx president, Adolfo Carrion, have been removed, and new, presumably more pliable members will take their place. (more…)

25th August
2005

First Published in The New York Sun, August 25, 2005

By Andrew Wolf

Credit is due to Wayne Barrett of the Village Voice for his useful dissection of last week’s Quinnipiac University poll results, which showed Fernando Ferrer maintaining his lead and the other three candidates in a dead heat for second.

Mr. Barrett correctly pointed out that reporters and commentators have been focusing on a smaller sample of likely primary voters, as opposed to the larger sample of Democrats that Quinnipiac has been polling on a regular basis since the beginning of the campaign.We were all just following the road map left for us in the Quinnipiac press release. (more…)

23rd August
2005

First Published in The New York Sun, August 23, 2005

By Andrew Wolf

Last week’s Quinnipiac poll, filled with bad news for Democrats, holds a ray of light for at least three of them.

The bad news, of course, is that they are fighting for a nomination that increasingly seems worthless. Democratic voters seem to “Like Mike” more than any of the four seeking the nod of their own party. (more…)

18th August
2005

First Published in The New York Sun, August 18, 2005

By Andrew Wolf

The Democrats held the year’s first “official” mayoral debate Tuesday evening. The event was official because the city’s Campaign Finance Board sponsored it, with participation a prerequisite for obtaining public matching funds.

The “Gang of Four” had sparred previously, indeed frequently — so frequently that the forums made hardly a blip on the public radar screen. But Tuesday’s affair seemed to receive a bit more attention, not so much because of its official status but because the calendar tells us there will be just four more weeks until the Democrats either choose an opponent to Mayor Bloomberg or at least narrow the field. (more…)